The Daily Campus

November 30, 2018

 

Thursday afternoon, as the Rainbow Center’s Out to Lunch Lecture of the week, Sheldon Raymore, an HIV/AIDS awareness advocate and member of the River Cheyenne Sioux Tribe, visited to speak about Two Spirit individuals; Two Spirit is a Native American concept to spiritually describe transgender, gender-nonconforming, gender-fluid and genderqueer individuals. The intersectional lecture coincided with Native American Heritage Month and World AIDs Day, which is this Saturday.

Raymore explained how the term Two Spirit originated in 1990 at an Indigenous LGBTQ gathering. A woman attending the conference shared a vision she’d had that introduced the term, which is slowly becoming more widely used. The term highlights the indigenous idea that all bodies have a male and a female spirit which is fluid within the physical body. Two Spirit individuals don’t always identify with the gender they were assigned at birth, but rather which spirit is more dominant within their body.

Two Spirit is exclusively an indigenous identity, according to Raymore.

“When we share our cultures, our history, our tradition, they’re not to be co-opted by others,” Raymore said.

Pre-colonial Native American tribes had a number of different words in different languages to describe these identities. Therefore, in recent years, indigenous LGBTQ community members felt they needed a term under which they could all unify, according to Raymore.

Two Spirit individuals played important roles within traditional indigenous cultures, Raymore said, and today maintain important roles as counselors, story-tellers, medical experts and more. Although during the colonial period, outside influences changed the perception of these community members, traditionally they were not stigmatized within their communities like LGBTQ individauls have faced in American culture.

“I’d never heard of how influential Two Spirit people were in history,” seventh-semester communications and history student Carina Zamudio said as a member of the audience. “It was really interesting to me that they were honored, not looked down upon.”

Raymore also included a lot of specific examples of Two Spirit individuals both from recent and more distant history. He shared a number of pictures, paintings and etchings of Two Spirit individuals, such as Whe’wa, a renowned potter and weaver; Osh-Tisch of the Crow Nation and Fred Martinez, a Navajo Two Spirit victim of a hate crime.

“The big takeaway for me was that hate crimes happen in every minority population,” first-semester biology major Josie Hamilton said from the audience. “As a black person, I always focus on the hate crimes that happen in my population, but that little boy was attacked because of his identity.”

Raymore also spent a significant amount of time talking about his work with HIV/AIDs Awareness. He’s recently been working on a project to raise awareness and reduce stigma of the disease within the Native American community through a record-keeping form of indigenous storytelling called “winter count,” or in his native Lakota language, “Waniyetu wowapi.” This practice chooses events by which to remember different years, pairs them with a symbol and traditionally paints them onto buffalo skins. Winter counts date back all the way to the 700s.

“I’ve found a way to communicate with my ancestors from another time period,” Raymore said of existing winter counts.

Through his work, Raymore has created a winter count that focuses on HIV/AIDS related events, like when the first Native American community member died of the disease, or when certain awareness events were held. The entire winter count can be found on his website.

Reference: http://dailycampus.com/stories/2018/11/30/native-american-two-spirit-concept-explained-at-rainbow-center

AICH News Item

“Germ City Exhibit” at the Museum Of The City Of New York now through April 28th, 2019.

A fascinating look at New York City’s battle against infectious disease.

Man and microbes have always co-habited, and their relationship has had a profound influence on human history—especially in cities, the crossroads of the movements of people, goods, and germs. Germ City: Microbes and the Metropolis explores the complex story of New York’s long battle against infectious disease—a fight involving government, urban planners, medical professionals, businesses, and activists. It reveals how our understanding of disease has changed us physically, socially, and culturally, and the surprising interplay between people and pathogens in an urban context.


This exhibition is organized by the Museum of the City of New York in collaboration with The New York Academy of Medicine and Wellcome. It is part of Wellcome’s international project Contagious Cities, which explores the interplay of people and pathogens in urban contexts. Drawing on the model of the Wellcome Collection’s “Reading Room,” Germ City features a hybrid gallery and library where visitors can view historical artifacts alongside contemporary artworks created for the exhibition, delve into the exhibition’s themes with a curated selection of books, and access a wide range of perspectives through digital interactives. (Reference: Museum Of The City Of New York Website)


The AICH Board Chair Rick Chavolla (Kumeyaay) worked with the new volunteer AICH Executive Director Curtis Harris-Davia (San Carlos Apache),  AICH Volunteer Sheldon Raymore (Cheyenne River Sioux), and AICH Volunteer Phillip Dallas Stands  (Rosebud Sioux) along with Museum Of The City Of New York’s Rebecca Hayes Jacobs (Post-Doctoral Curatorial Fellow) and Deputy Director & Chief Curator Sarah M. Henry to ensure that the American Indian Community House was included in this very important exhibition.  AICH was given a two shelf vitrine to choose items that could voice our narrative.  This will be an ongoing collaboration between AICH and The Museum of the City of New York.  We will be putting out a call for more AICH community members to have an opportunity to display their works in this exhibit for the second round of display items which will be in November 2018.  For inquiries about having your work displayed please contact sraymore@aich.org  We will need photos of the work your submitting and a brief statement as to why you wish to be apart of the Germ City Exhibit.


Museum of the City of New York’s Rebecca Hayes Jacobs worked with the exhibit designers and AICH to have these labels created to read the following.


American Indian Community House – The American Indian Community house began providing services to New York Native Americans living with HIV and AIDS in 1990. Up until that point, there were no existing services that were culturally appropriate for the city’s Native American community. AICH developed prevention messaging that reflected the diversity of the Native community of New York City and incorporated traditional healing methods for Native people living with HIV and AIDS. The items on display here were created and selected by members to represent their history and ongoing work.


Traditional Healing – In Native American traditions, healing is a process of the whole Self, and not just the individual body part or illness. Our elders taught us that health and happiness are the natural state for human beings. For every ailment caused by an imbalance there is an herb, a root, a ceremony, a song, and the right-making words of prayer. Sage, sweetgrass, mugwort, tobacco, and cedar were used in healing and to convey prayers to the Creator. The plants were burned in a fire, after prayer, or in an abalone shell with an eagle feathers.


Richmond, C. Harris, K. Soto, K. Lebsock, T. Edwards, C. Coon, T. G. Firchner,  “A Native American Leadership Response to HIV and AIDS,” American Indian Community House, funded by the NYS DOH AIDS Institute, 1996 – The American Indian Community House wrote this document in 1996 to address the lack of culturally appropriate HIV services for Native Americans in New York State. It was intended as a comprehensive state-wide needs assessment from Native Americans throughout the state. It also defined recommendations on health policy that affect the delivery of services, education, and prevention surrounding HIV and AIDS.


“Silence = Death” choker, designed and crafted by Phillip Stands – The beaded choker and breast plate are a traditional Lakota means of protecting a warrior’s areas of vulnerability, and this choker is designed to signify to Two-Spirits in New York City that what makes us vulnerable can become our means of protection. Our identity can be slur or armor, our voice can be a war-cry or silent. To stay silent is to leave yourself exposed in a land of new threats and challenges.


PrEPahHontoz Beaded Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Pills – In 2013, AICH hired a new community educator who presented the first ever PrEP and Pep presentation at the AICH.  PrEP is a course of drugs designed for people who are not HIV-positive but are at high risk of being exposed to the virus.


Miniature Buffalo Skull Carving – The buffalo skull symbolizes the 19th century demise of the buffalo—an emblem of Great Plains Native culture—and also references the “Vanishing Indian” theory, a widely held notion among Americans that Native peoples, like the buffalo, also were dying out. Indeed, in the early 20th century, the Native population had dropped to approximately 250,000, a decrease of some 95 percent of pre-European contact levels. “A good day to live” is a play on the statement, “It’s a good day to die,” attributed to the 19th-century Oglala Lakota leader Crazy Horse.   This was made in honor of the efforts done by the American Red Cross and their 1990 Campaigns throughout Indian Country.


Beaded Turtle Umbilical Cord Bag with Beaded Red AIDS Ribbon – HIV medicines work by preventing the virus from multiplying, which reduces the amount of HIV (viral load) in the body. Having a lower viral load protects a woman’s health and reduces her risk of passing HIV to her child during pregnancy and childbirth.  Among the Plains tribal nations, babies’ umbilical cords are placed in these bags and the child wears them until puberty for good luck.


PrEPahHontoz Miniature Tipi Cover – The Tipi is a symbol that represents home, family, and community. Tipi covers have “Winter Counts” created and placed upon them to tell stories.  In the Lakota-Sioux language the words “Waniyetu Wowapi” translate to “Winter Count.” Images are etched, painted, or drawn on buffalo hides (later on muslin fabric) to mark a notable occurrence amongst the Sioux people, creating a timeline and serving as a historical record of events.  These Winter Counts record the HIV/AIDS movement from the Native American community in New York City and across the nation. “Tradition as Prevention” is a core value of the Tipi Project: this way of preserving information for generations to come is being revised and reclaimed, as we continue to battle the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Native communities.

Article written by Sheldon Raymore.  For more information visit the Musuem Of The City Of New York’s website at https://www.mcny.org/exhibition/germ-city

buffalo's fire

Sheldon Raymore, Lakota, brings HIV Prevention and Anti-Stigma to Amsterdam

Raymore: “Conversations about HIV/AIDS can be difficult to have in Native circles.”

July 23, 2018 News Release

PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project


After successful exhibit events at prestigious venues like New York’s Whitney Museum of Art, and the United Nations Permanent Forum On Indigenous Issues, Lakota artist and traditionalist Sheldon Raymore brings his groundbreaking “PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project” to Amsterdam, Netherlands at the 22nd International AIDS Conference on July 23rd-27th.  The International Indigenous Working Group On HIV & AIDS (IIWGHA,) who hosted the Pre-conference says, “It is themed around building bridges across the world and uniting our strengths in order for Indigenous Peoples to take their rightful place on the international stage (www.iiwgha.org).”

Both conferences have values that speak to the heart of what Raymore has been cultivating for years both as a Native American artist and an HIV/AIDS advocate and activist.  Raymore initially invented his performance character “PrEPahHontoz,” to encourage indigenous individuals to seek PrEP services, and consider adding the once daily pill that prevents HIV infection to their prevention arsenals. Having released her debut single “Take The Pill,” last year, PrEPahHontoz captivates audiences with her unique blend of Native American sign language, urban vogueing, and tradition.


PrEPahHontoz drives home HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention in an innovative way that honors Indigenous traditions in a modern world.

“She’s sassy and has something important to say,” says Raymore, an enrolled member of the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe. “As Indigenous people, storytelling is an important part of our culture. Art is a way to convey stories and ideas in a fun and engaging way.”


“As I began to see the absence of the native voice and narrative throughout the story of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and movement, it became clearer that there was a need for an intervention like the ‘PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project’ to facilitate that narrative, and to fight the silencing of our people,” says Raymore.


With support from the American Indian Community House NYC, Office of Minority Health Resource Center, Indian Health Service, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), Gofundme Donors, individual artists, and volunteers, the “PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project” harnesses the traditional and cultural relevance of the Lakota “winter count.” Historically, each hand-drawn symbol tells the story of an important event that happened during that year among the Lakota tribes. Usually drawn and/or painted on a buffalo hide, these winter counts serve as a traditional history book.

The “PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project” marks important events in the Native American community throughout the past 30 plus years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic with a winter count designed for an event that has happened each year.


They have been hand-drawn and painted on to life-size tipis by Raymore and native volunteer artists from the NYC indigenous community. The result is a breathtaking, living piece of art, history, and resilience.

“The tipi project utilizes art and culture as prevention and treatment,” says Raymore. “Conversations about HIV/AIDS can be difficult to have in Native circles. As the artists were given a year and event to create a winter count for, these conversations happened naturally.”


“Community members were engaged, learning, sharing experiences pertaining to HIV/AIDS, and supporting one another. That is what the “PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project” is all about. Mobilizing native communities to know both the history of HIV/AIDS, it’s current state, and the role we as First Nations people play in not just surviving another epidemic, but ending it!.”  Taking a nine-foot painted tipi from New York to Amsterdam is no easy task. Raymore’s delivery of his message of accountability and action to Amsterdam is powered by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the Office Of Minority Health Resource Center, and IHS.  “I’m really excited to attend the 7th International Indigenous Pre-Conference on HIV and AIDS, and the International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam, Netherlands. This is such an amazing opportunity to be a part of the Indigenous representation at both of these events,” says Raymore.


The visual artist, designer, spoken word artist, award-winning grass dancer, and actor has earned the respect of countless community members and supporters as a native activist, a visionary, and a leader. There is no doubt that history will repeat itself in Amsterdam this month.


read full article here: http://www.buffalosfire.com/sheldon-raymore-lakota-brings-hiv-prevention-and-anti-stigma-to-amsterdam/

indian country today

Sheldon Raymore, Lakota, brings HIV Prevention and Anti-Stigma to Amsterdam

ICT editorial team

by ICT editorial team

Jul 20, 2018

-edited


Raymore: "Conversations about HIV/AIDS can be difficult to have in Native circles."


News Release


PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project


After successful exhibit events at prestigious venues like New York’s Whitney Museum of Art, and the United Nations Permanent Forum On Indigenous Issues, Lakota artist and traditionalist Sheldon Raymore brings his groundbreaking “PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project” to Amsterdam, Netherlands at the International Indigenous Pre-conference on HIV and AIDS 2018 - July 21st-22nd as well as to the 22nd International AIDS Conference on July 23rd-27th.  The International Indigenous Working Group On HIV & AIDS (IIWGHA,) who is hosting the Pre-conference says, "It is themed around building bridges across the world and uniting our strengths in order for Indigenous Peoples to take their rightful place on the international stage (www.iiwgha.org)."  Both conferences have values that speak to the heart of what Raymore has been cultivating for years both as a Native American artist and an HIV/AIDS advocate and activist.  Raymore initially invented his performance character "PrEPahHontoz," to encourage indigenous individuals to seek PrEP services, and consider adding the once daily pill that prevents HIV infection to their prevention arsenals. Having released her debut single "Take The Pill," last year, PrEPahHontoz captivates audiences with her unique blend of Native American sign language, urban vogueing, and tradition.  PrEPahHontoz drives home HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention in an innovative way that honors Indigenous traditions in a modern world.  

"She's sassy and has something important to say," says Raymore, an enrolled member of the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe. "As Indigenous people, storytelling is an important part of our culture. Art is a way to convey stories and ideas in a fun and engaging way."  "As I began to see the absence of the native voice and narrative throughout the story of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and movement, it became clearer that there was a need for an intervention like the 'PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project' to facilitate that narrative, and to fight the silencing of our people," says Raymore.  With support from the American Indian Community House NYC, Office of Minority Health Resource Center, Indian Health Service, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), Gofundme Donors, individual artists, and volunteers, the "PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project" harnesses the traditional and cultural relevance of the Lakota "winter count." Historically, each hand-drawn symbol tells the story of an important event that happened during that year among the Lakota tribes. Usually drawn and/or painted on a buffalo hide, these winter counts serve as a traditional history book.  The "PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project" marks important events in the Native American community throughout the past 30 plus years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic with a winter count designed for an event that has happened each year.  They have been hand-drawn and painted on to life size tipis by Raymore and native volunteer artists from the NYC indigenous community. The result is a breathtaking, living piece of art, history, and resilience.  "The tipi project utilizes art and culture as prevention and treatment," says Raymore. "Conversations about HIV/AIDS can be difficult to have in Native circles. As the artists were given a year and event to create a winter count for, these conversations happened naturally."


"Community members were engaged, learning, sharing experiences pertaining to HIV/AIDS, and supporting one another. That is what the "PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project" is all about. Mobilizing native communities to know both the history of HIV/AIDS, it's current state, and the role we as First Nations people play in not just surviving another epidemic, but ending it!."  Taking a nine-foot painted tipi from New York to Amsterdam is no easy task. Raymore's delivery of his message of accountability and action to Amsterdam is powered by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the Office Of Minority Health Resource Center, and IHS.  "I’m really excited to attend the 7th International Indigenous Pre-Conference on HIV and AIDS, and the International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam, Netherlands. This is such an amazing opportunity to be a part of the Indigenous representation at both of these events," says Raymore.  The visual artist, designer, spoken word artist, award winning grass dancer, and actor has earned the respect of countless community members and supporters as a native activist, a visionary, and a leader. There is no doubt that history will repeat itself in Amsterdam this month.


To read full article, visit https://newsmaven.io/indiancountrytoday/the-press-pool/sheldon-raymore-lakota-brings-hiv-prevention-and-anti-stigma-to-amsterdam-FPIJqG5XokiiH229413GBw/

express press release

Lakota interdisciplinary artist to present and exhibit "PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project" in Netherlands

New York City, USA, July 20, 2018 — /EPR Network/ — by in Education, Entertainment, Environment, Government, Healthcare, Human Resources, Marketing, Media, Non Profit


After successful exhibit events at prestigious venues like New York’s Whitney Museum of Art, and the United Nations Permanent Forum On Indigenous Issues, Lakota artist and traditionalist Sheldon Raymore brings his ground breaking “PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project” to Amsterdam, Netherlands at the International Indigenous Pre-Conference on HIV ands AIDS 2018 – July 21st-22nd – as well as the 22nd International AIDS Conference – July 23rd-27th. The International Indigenous Working Group On HIV & AIDS (IIWGHA) who is hosting the Pre-Conference says, “It is themed around building bridges across the world and uniting our strengths in order for Indigenous Peoples to take their rightful place on the international stage (www.iiwgha.org).” Both conferences have values that speak to the heart of what Raymore has been cultivating for years both as a Native American artist and an HIV/AIDS advocate and activist.

Raymore initially invented his performances character “PrEPahHontoz,” to encourage indigenous individuals to seek PrEP services, and consider adding the once daily pill that prevents HIV infection to their prevention arsenals. Having released her debut single “Take The Pill,” last year, PrEPahHontoz captivates audiences with her unique blend of Native American sign language, urban voguing, and tradition. PrEPahHontoz drives home HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention in an innovative way that honors Indigenous traditions in a modern world.  “She’s sassy and has something important to say,” says Raymore, the incredibly humble and reserved enrolled member of the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe. “As Indigenous people, story telling is an important part of our culture. Art is a way to convey stories and ideas in a fun and engaging way,” says the South Dakota native.  “As I began to see the absence of the native voice and narrative throughout the story of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and movement, it became clearer that there was a need for an intervention like the ‘PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project’ to facilitate that narrative, and to fight the silencing of our people,” says Raymore. With support from the American Indian Community House NYC, Office of Minority Health Resource Center, Indian Health Service, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), Gofundme Donors, Individual Artists, and Volunteers, the “PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project” harnesses the traditional and cultural relevance of the Lakota “winter count.” Historically, each hand drawn symbol tells the story of an important event that happened during that year among the Lakota tribes. Usually drawn and/or painted on a buffalo hyde, these winer counts serve as a traditional history book. The “PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project” marks important events in the Native American community throughout the past 30 plus years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic with a winter count designed for an event that has happened each year. They have been hand drawn and painted on to life size tipis by Raymore and native volunteer artists from the NYC indigenous community. The result is a breath taking living piece of art, history, and resilience. “The tipi project utilizes art and culture as prevention and treatment,” says Raymore. “Conversations about HIV/AIDS can be difficult to have in native circles. As the artists were given a year and event to create a winter count for, these conversations happened naturally,” he explained.  “Community members were engaged, learning, sharing experiences pertaining to HIV/AIDS, and supporting one another. That is what the “PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project” is all about. Mobilizing native communities to know both the history of HIV/AIDS, it’s current state, and the role we as First Nations people play in not just surviving another epidemic, but ending it!.”United Nations representative Véronique Lozano expressed her feelings about the project, “the prepahhontoz tipi project Is a perfectly culturally appropriate artwork bringing attention to indigenous peoples often made invisible and left behind but that are also greatly affected by HIV. “ Lazano has been a tremendous support, and quite instrumental in the “PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project” exhibiting at both conferences. Taking a nine foot painted tipi from New York to Amsterdam is no easy task. Raymore’s delivery of his message of accountability and action to Amsterdam is powered by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the Office Of Minority Health Resource Center, and IHS.“I’m really excited to attend the 7th International Indigenous Pre-Conference on HIV and AIDS, and the International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam, Netherlands. This is such an amazing opportunity to be apart of the Indigenous representation at both of these events,” says Raymore.The visual artist, designer, spoken word artist, award winning grass dancer, and actor has earned the respect of countless community members and supporters as a native activist, a visionary, and a leader. There is no doubt that history will repeat itself in Amsterdam this month. 


Read full article here: https://express-press-release.net/news/2018/07/20/287139

A tribe called geek

Two-Spirit Pop Artist Redefines HIV Response Through Multidisciplinary Arts at AIDS 2018 Amsterdam

A Tribe Called Geek  July 19, 2018

A Two-Spirit Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe artist’s Tipi Project will be showcased at International Indigenous Pre-Conference on HIV and AIDS at the De Nieuwe Liefde Gallery on July 21-22, 2018. Amsterdam will welcome one of three tipis around the world including the Whitney Museum of Art in New York City and UN Nations New York.

The Tipi Project is the creation of PrEPahHontoz, the two-spirit performance and pop artist who is redefining the HIV response through multidisciplinary arts. Captivating audiences with her unique blend of Native American sign language, urban voguing, music, and tradition, PrEPahHontoz drives home HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention in an innovative way that honors Indigenous traditions in a modern world.

“As Indigenous people, storytelling is an important part of our culture.  Art is a way to convey stories and ideas in a fun engaging way,” said Sheldon Raymore/ PrEPahHontoz, Native American spokesperson for PrEP, HIV/AIDS Prevention and Awareness.


Tipi Details:

  • Size 9 foot x 9 foot
  • The Tipi is cone-shaped tent and an Indigenous symbol of home and community. Each tipi’s artwork is unique and tells the stories of the HIV/AIDS movement from the Native American community.

When: 

  • July 21–22, 2018, Daily 9:00AM-5:00PM
  • Tipi Installation begins 9:00 AM and remains on display weekend-long.

Where: 

  • De Nieuwe Liefde, Da Costakade 102, 1053 WP, Amsterdam

Free Registration & IIPCHA Info: http://bit.ly/IIPCHA2018
Tipi Project Info: https://prepahhontoz.com/tipi-project


Read full article here: https://atribecalledgeek.com/two-spirit-pop-artist-redefines-hiv-response-through-multidisciplinary-arts-at-aids-2018-amsterdam/

Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network (CAAN)

New York Pop Artist Redefines HIV Response Through Multidisciplinary Arts at AIDS 2018 Amsterdam

        

News provided by Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network (CAAN)  07:30 ET    

Indigenous Tipi Project Brings NYC Stories to the Netherlands  


NEW YORK, July 17, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -  


What:    New York-based artist's Tipi Project will be showcased at International Indigenous Pre-Conference on HIV and AIDS at the De Nieuwe Liefde Gallery on July 21-22, 2018. Amsterdam will welcome one of three tipis around the world including the Whitney Museum of Art in New York City and UN Nations New York.   The Tipi Project is the creation of PrEPahHontoz, the two-spirit performance and pop artist who is redefining the HIV response through multidisciplinary arts. Captivating audiences with her unique blend of Native American sign language, urban voguing, music, and tradition, PrEPahHontoz drives home HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention in an innovative way that honors Indigenous traditions in a modern world.  "As Indigenous people, storytelling is an important part of our culture.  Art is a way to convey stories and ideas in a fun engaging way," said Sheldon Raymore/ PrEPahHontoz, Native American spokesperson for PrEP, HIV/AIDS Prevention and Awareness.  Tipi Details: •Size 9 foot x 9 foot  •The Tipi is cone-shaped tent and an Indigenous symbol of home and community. Each tipi's artwork is unique and tells the stories of the HIV/AIDS movement from the Native American community.    When:  •July 21–22, 2018, Daily 9:00AM-5:00PM  •Tipi Installation begins 9:00 AM and remains on display weekend-long.   Where:  •De Nieuwe Liefde, Da Costakade 102, 1053 WP, Amsterdam   Free Registration & IIPCHA Info: http://bit.ly/IIPCHA2018   Tipi Project Info: https://prepahhontoz.com/tipi-project  About the International Indigenous Pre-Conference of HIV and AIDS Co-Host:    The International Indigenous HIV & AIDS Community is an NGO and is an International Civil Society Partner of the Conference Coordinating Committee (CCC) of the International AIDS Conference. The NGO has helped to plan, coordinate and implement AIDS 2018 Amsterdam and will do the same for AIDS 2020 San Francisco. Their 10-Point Statement creates a plan of advocacy and action that brings forward the worldviews of Indigenous peoples around the world and aligns a global Indigenous-led response to end HIV and AIDS.  Sheldon Raymore / PrEPahHontoz is available for advance phone interviews and on location. Raymore is also a speaker on July 22, 9:30-10:30AM Stigma, Discrimination & Criminalization Panel.   MEDIA IMAGES + MEDIA FACT SHEET:  http://bit.ly/iipcha2018media  SOURCE Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network (CAAN)


Read Full Article Here:

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-york-pop-artist-redefines-hiv-response-through-multidisciplinary-arts-at-aids-2018-amsterdam-300681663.html

voices of ny

‘Two-Spirit’ Art in NYC by Sean Parrish

July 3, 2018


"The contemporary artists in attendance at the opening expressed the importance of cultural preservation and how it has inspired the creation of their art and designs.


Raymore, a second-generation tipi maker from the Cheyenne River Reservation in South Dakota, spoke in an interview with Voices of NY about his inspiration for the making of his art.


Of one work at the exhibit he said, “This piece is inspired by the PrEPahHontoz Tipi Project Winter: Waníyetu Wakáǧa Wipátȟapi, [which] in Lakota means ‘Produce Tipi Covers Winter.’ Each of the symbols represents a year in HIV/AIDS history and how it has affected Native Americans.”

April 2018

Sheldon Raymore, de la tribu Sioux, junto a su tipi de la campaña PrEPahHontoz, en uno de los eventos paralelos sobre VIH de la sesión del Foro Permanente sobre Asuntos Indígenas

Sheldon Raymore, de la tribu Sioux de Estados Unidos, montó un tipi (tienda cónica indígena) de su campaña PrEPahHontoz (que une la sigla PrEP, de profilaxis preexposición al VIH y el nombre indígena Pocahontas) en donde pintó “símbolos tradicionales que representan una historia una línea de tiempo de experiencias de personas indígenas con VIH desde mediados de los años 80”.

Naciones Unidas: Piden reunión de grupo de expertos sobre VIH y pueblos indígenas

El grupo internacional indígena de trabajo en VIH (IIWGHA) reiteró, en la 17 sesión del Foro Permanente de Naciones Unidas sobre Asuntos Indígenas, la urgencia de convocar a una reunión de expertos en 2019 para dar una respuesta global a la pandemia en pueblos originarios y así “no dejar a nadie atrás”.

national minority aids council

Congratulations to Hannabah Blue (Navajo), Savannah Gene (Navajo), Rick Haverkate (Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians), Trudie Jackson (Navajo), Kerry Hawk Lessard (Shawnee), and Sheldon Raymore (Sioux) for being chosen for NMAC's new American Indian and Alaskan Native Constituent Advisory Panel (CAP) members. They will join members Elton Naswood (Navajo) and Joseph Cantil (AN).  Constituent Advisory Panels (CAPS) are a new 2018 initiative to better connect with key consitituents. Based on concerns raised at the 2017 United States Conference on AIDS (USCA) and the Biomedical HIV Prevention Summit (Summit), NMAC has assembled five CAP's to ensure inclusivity and visibility of our key constituent groups.


Click link for more information: http://www.nmac.org/constituent-advisory-panels/native-american-cap/

poz magazine

POZ March 2018 https://www.poz.com/magazine/poz-march-2018

to read full article click on link written by Rita Rubin

"To help raise awareness about PrEP and HIV among LGBT (also known as Two Spirit) Native Americans, 38-year-old performance artist Sheldon Raymore developed the character PrEPahHontoz.


Raymore is a member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe and has lived in New York City for more than a decade.  He serves as the community outreach staffer at the American Indian Community House, a nonprofit serving the health, social service and cultural needs of Native Americans who live in the city.


"Many Two Spirit individuals from tribes across North America remain unaware of PrEP as an option for their HIV Prevention method arsenal, "says PrEPahHontoz on her website.  "She's been a wonderful ambassador, "Raymore says of PrEPahHontoz, who released her first single "Take the Pill," on iTunes last June.


In photographs and at public appearances, PrEPahHontoz wears a traditional costume embellished with red AIDS ribbons and wooden beads made to resemble blue Truvada capsules, courtesy of a crafty seller Raymore found on Etsy.


Raymore has been on PrEP for more than two years, and he has experienced firsthand the lack of awareness about PrEP among Native Americans.  Although he was born and raised off the reservation, in Fremont, California, he inherited the home his late father owned on their tribe's reservation in central South Dakota.


"Were still tied to the reservation," Raymore says of himself and his family.  "I make it back there every summer, especially during ceremonial times of the year."


On one recent trip to the reservation, Greyhound lost his luggage, which contained his Truvada.  He went to the tribal clinic, but it stocked Truvada only for treating HIV, not for prevention.  "I actually had to educate the doctor about PrEP," Raymore says."


Quote and photographs from POZ Magazine article by Rita Rubin

Performance artist Sheldon Raymore in character as PrEPahHontoz photo by Dennis Cahlo




buzzfeed

Photos by Matika Wilbur

Pictured here: Landa Lakes at the Bay Area American Indian Two Spirit Society Powwow in San Francisco, California

These Stunning Portraits Show What It’s Like To Be A Two-Spirit Native American Today

"I think that the more people who share their true spirit with others, the more healing will spread.”

Posted on February 14, 2018, at 5:31 p.m.


"Two-spirits are dealing with a lot of lateral oppression and violence and a lot of stigma.  I created PrEPahHontoz to combat those stigmas and to bring a Native voice to the larger HIV/AIDS movement.  Her message is HIV prevention and adhering to the medication, but really her purpose is to go out to communities and educate on topics that maybe people are too shy or too silent to say anything about." -Sheldon Raymore, Cheyenne River Sioux


Pictured Here: Sheldon Raymore 



Photos and quotes from BuzzFeed article by Kate Bubacz

Click here for full article:

https://www.buzzfeed.com/katebubacz/these-stunning-portraits-show-what-its-like-to-be-a-two?utm_term=.pt1VN7Yqz#.qhWvjJE89

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